LAB MEMBERS2018-10-08T21:02:12+00:00
Dan

Daniel Dombeck

Principal Investigator
d-dombeck@northwestern.edu

AT&T Research Fellow
B.S. Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL
Ph.D. Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Postdoc Neuroscience, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Jason and his girls

Jason Climer

Postdoctoral Fellow
jason.r.climer@gmail.com

How does the brain set up memories? Memories are stored by changing the strength of neural connections, but how these networks are set up is poorly understood. Dr. Jason Climer is developing novel microscopy, molecular, and statistical techniques to learn how inputs shape memories formed during navigation.

Heydar

Heydar Davoudi

Postdoctoral Fellow
heydar.davoudi@gmail.com

I’m interested in the neural mechanisms for spatial navigation and episodic memory at the subcellular level. By developing two-photon imaging of dendritic spines, I study how place cells in hippocampal output area CA1 integrate the spatial and contextual information of their inputs.  I received my PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in  2017 in David Foster’s lab, where I integrated in vivo electrophysiology and optogenetics to uncover the contribution of hippocampal area CA3 to the formation of CA1 place cell responses.

Jim and Emery

Jim Heys

Postdoctoral Fellow
jimheys@gmail.com

My primary interest is in understanding the neural mechanisms of learning and memory in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. My work in the Dombeck lab has been focused upon developing novel cellular resolution in vivo imaging methods, and applying these methods to investigate neural representations of time and space in medial entorhinal cortex.

John and his car

John Issa

Postdoctoral Fellow
john.issa@northwestern.edu

My goal is to understand how the brain processes information in a distributed and efficient manner. In particular, I am using imaging tools to study neural activity in the hippocampal formation during ongoing behavior.

Mike and his food

Mike Adoff

Graduate Student
MichaelAdoff2018@u.northwestern.edu

I am interested in how spatial memories are created and stored in the brain and, more specifically, how synaptic integrative properties contribute to place field formation and maintenance in the hippocampus of awake behaving animals.  By using in vivo two-photon imaging to record synaptic inputs to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in navigating mice, I hope to address some of these questions without creating too many more.

Maite and her King (of Spain)

Maite Azcorra Sedano

Graduate Student
maiteazcorrasedano2020@u.northwestern.edu

Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra have been implicated in an array of functions, from movement regulation to learning. I am interested in studying the relationship between this functional diversity and the recently discovered molecular diversity of dopamine neurons, trying to understand whether different dopaminergic neuron subtypes have distinct functions.

David Bowie the Cat and Brad

Brad Radvansky

Graduate Student
radvansky@fastmail.com

The world around us is comprised of many separate modalities of sensory features (sights, sounds, smells, etc.), yet from these disparate features the brain is able to construct a unified concept of space.  What are the mechanisms by which the brain transforms raw sensation into spatial cognition?  To answer this, we study the responses of hippocampal “place cells” to precisely-controlled sensory feature manipulations in visual and olfactory virtual reality.

Former Lab Members

Postdocs:
Mark Howe (website) – markhowe72@gmail.com
Mark Sheffield (website) – sheffield@uchicago.edu
Ed Han (website) – ehan23@wustl.edu